Bottle dating old

There’s alot of great information already available on the web, as well as in books and magazines, but I’ve tried to gather some of the very best, basic info together onto this site, in particular concentrating on identification marks found on bottles, insulators and tableware.

I’m also in the process of adding various articles to this site, discussing various glass companies, different types of glass and glass items. Bottles, candleholder & insulator " data-medium-file="https:// data-large-file="https:// class="alignnone size-full wp-image-857" title="glass-1" src=" alt="" width="600" height="201" srcset="https:// https:// sizes="(max-width: 600px) 100vw, 600px" / The glassmaking industry in the US is a huge field that dates back to the 1600s, and covers a vast array of items and applications, including both handmade and machine-made glass.

The ship appeared on the bottles between the words "Old" and "Spice", which were in red script.

This website now has a permanent home courtesy of the Society for Historical Archaeology (SHA). This entire website is essentially a "key" - albeit a complex one - to the dating and typing (typology) of historic bottles.For a brief, basic discussion on glass (especially concerning the most common type of glass used for containers and tableware), check out my webpage here: What is Glass? Where was the physical location of the sand supply that eventually was turned into the glass piece that you hold in your hand?Every glass object, even the most lowly, commonplace glass bottle, has a story behind it, although all of the precise details may never be known. What was the name of the company or factory where it was produced? Is it American-made, or a piece that was produced outside the United States?In the picture below are shown a number of lip styles common during the last century.All of the above lips were applied to the neck of the bottle after it was removed from the mold.