Dating a abused women

Victims can be of any age, sex, race, culture, religion, education, employment or marital status.

Although both men and women can be abused, most victims are women.

Children in homes where there is domestic violence are more likely to be abused and/or neglected.

Most children in these homes know about the violence.

She joined us to discuss the emotional abuse of women, how to stand up to an abusive partner, get out of an abusive relationship, and even deal with emotional abuse in the workplace. There are many types of emotional abuse but most is done in an attempt to control or subjugate another person.

It can include everything from verbal abuse to the silent treatment, domination to subtle manipulation.

Most female victims of intimate partner violence were previously victimized by the same offender, including 77% of females ages 18 to 24, 76% of females ages 25 to 34, and 81% of females ages 35 to 49.[x]81% of women who experienced rape, stalking, or physical violence by an intimate partner reported significant short- or long-term impacts such as post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms and injury.[iii]An estimated 13% of women and 6% of men have experienced sexual coercion in their lifetime (i.e.

More than half of domestic violence victims (57%) said they were distracted, almost half (45%) feared getting discovered, and two in five were afraid of their intimate partner’s unexpected visit (either by phone or in person).[iv]Nine in ten employees (91%) say that domestic violence has a negative impact on their company’s bottom line.

The abuser will question the victim about who the victim talks to, accuse the victim of flirting, or become jealous of time spent with others.

The abuser may call the victim frequently during the day, drop by unexpectedly, refuse to let the victim work, check the car mileage, or ask friends to watch the victim.

If you are not from the Midcoast Maine area, here are some resources that may be of help to you: the Maine Coalition to End Domestic Violence at 1-866-83-4HELP or via the web at the National Domestic Violence Hotline, 1-800-799-7233 or via the web at

The following is a list of behaviors that may indicate a potential batterer.