Dating and marriage in the 1920s

Gurung & Duong (1999) compiled a study relating to mixed-ethnic relationships ("MER"s) and same-ethnic relationships ("SER"s), concluding that individuals part of "MER"s generally do not view themselves differently from same-ethnic couples.

In Social Trends in America and Strategic Approaches to the Negro Problem (1948), Swedish economist Gunnar Myrdal ranked the social areas where restrictions were imposed on the freedom of Black Americans by Southern White Americans through racial segregation, from the least to the most important: basic public facility access, social equality, jobs, courts and police, politics and marriage.

Such phenomena as hooking up and lavaliering are widely prominent among university and college students.

Hooking up is a world wide phenomenon that involves two individuals having a sexual encounter without interest in commitment.

As with concepts like the “teenager” and “middle-class,” dating is an historically recent invention, spurred by an influx of women into the big cities seeking work around the turn of the 20th Century.

The word “date” was coined — inadvertently, it seems — by George Ade, a columnist for the Chicago Record, in 1896.

dating and marriage in the 1920s-90dating and marriage in the 1920s-40dating and marriage in the 1920s-10dating and marriage in the 1920s-70

When women first hit the workforce, writes Weigel, “the belief remained widespread they were working not to support themselves but only to supplement the earnings of fathers or husbands.” As such, “employers used this misconception as an excuse to pay women far less than they paid men.In a column about “working class lives,” he told of a clerk named Artie whose girlfriend was losing interest in him and beginning to see other men socially.When Artie confronts his fading love, he says, “I s’pose the other boy’s fillin’ all my dates?Her combination of dry humor and uncompromising honesty gained her a huge following.Her column had a confidential tone that was very appealing; it read as if she was telling a friend about her antics the night before.