East european dating scams

'Her' name was Aleksandra and 'she' was young and pretty with a long, dark mane of hair and dark brown eyes.She contacted Dave (not his real name) on dating site Zoosk in November last year, telling him she was a 32-year-old Russian woman eager to pursue a serious relationship.She had emailed her phone number but told Dave he could not call her, saying "my phone doesn't accept international calls".Although she said she was 32 years old, the pictures she sent appeared to be of a much younger woman.Her emails from a Gmail account arrived every two days and at first were full of the little details of her life, like walking in the park with her friends and hanging out for pizza.She sent dozens of pictures of her eating cake, dressed in a bathrobe, lying chastely on the bed, always dressed in white.

They’re part of criminal gangs operating from Nigeria, Ghana, South-Africa, England, Spain, the United States or Malaysia.

In the early 1990s when the company first launched, it used catalogs to introduce men to Russian women.

The company launched its first website in January 1997 and expanded its business in more cities throughout Russia and the Ukraine.

A new report by the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau has found that last year, singles were conned out of £39 million by fraudsters they’d met on dating sites and apps.

Con artists are increasingly creating fake online profiles and tricking people on dating sites into handing over often large sums of money.