Grant backdating

Law360, New York (June 15, 2006, AM EDT) -- It is virtually impossible to pick up a newspaper these days and not see an article about the ever-growing list of companies being caught up in investigations concerning allegations of backdated stock options.

Despite the attention paid to this issue, little has been written explaining why backdating options is problematic and potentially illegal.

Unlike the abusive corporate tax shelter ploys which often involve complex manipulation of a transaction to achieve tax results that are inconsistent with the economic reality of the deal, stock option backdating is a relatively crude device: A corporation merely changes the date that a stock option was actually granted to an earlier time when the stock price was lower.

Thus, the option becomes "in the money", meaning there was a built-in profit on the underlying stock, on the grant date.

There is no statute that explicitly outlaws backdating stock-option grants, but it seems virtually impossible to backdate options and achieve the ultimate goal of putting grants “in the money” without first deliberately falsifying documents and then covering up the sham.

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As expected, the charges focused on backdating stock options by doctoring employment documents, neglecting to record the stock-option expense on the company’s books, and misleading investors.An example illustrates the potential benefit of backdating to the recipient.The Wall Street Journal (see discussion of article below) pointed out a CEO option grant dated October 1998.This is a way of repricing options to make them valuable or more valuable when the option "strike price" (the fixed price at which the owner of the option can purchase stock) is fixed to the stock price at the date the option was granted.Cases of backdating employee stock options have drawn public and media attention.