Who pays while dating

An online date has to be casual, nonchalant, and most importantly, chill—you can’t commit to a four-hour dinner and a movie hang with someone when all you know about them is that they went to Machu Picchu once and “don’t want drama.”The go-to modern date now is a quick beer at a low-key bar.

That way, if your Tinder match is a home-schooled-mouth-breather, you can make an excuse and bounce. And because we’re all so used to the low-stakes hang, the idea of a proper date suddenly seems like a big ask.

In the past the answer to this question was generally simple, as women did not work or make money and the date was a chance for men to prove that they could be good providers.

Hence when the bill came, the men took out their wallet in a both chivalrous and practical gesture.

Interestingly enough, an almost equal percentage of women would feel offended if the man didn’t let them pay.

In the meanwhile, two thirds of men feel women should contribute but most feel guilty about feeling that way.

Now, like everything in the world, this isn't an absolute.

The dinner trend hangs on, even as women today have arguably ascended to their highest-ever levels of educational attainment; economic and political power.

Despite the enormous and admirable strides women have made in recent decades, there seems to be one physical limitation many women still have: Reaching for their wallets on dates.

Women can fight side by side with men in war, compete successfully with men in the boardroom, and equal or better us on many playing fields.

A woman was the Democratic presidential nominee, women have cracked — if not quite broken — the glass ceiling, and female college graduates outnumber their male peers.

Yet at the end of a date, especially a first date, the default expectation is that the man will pay.